An Introduction to the Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning and Dialogue

Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning and Dialogue

 

This is the third in our series on links to other sites. As described on their website, The Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning and Dialogue (formerly known as the Boston Research Center for the 21st Century) has the mission of “engaging diverse scholars, activists, and social innovators in the search for the ideas and solutions that will assist in the peaceful evolution of humanity.

So how does the Center do this? As noted in the “About” section of its website, here is what they say:

Since 1993, the Center has engaged diverse scholars, activists, and social innovators in the search for the ideas and solutions that will assist in the peaceful evolution of humanity. Founded by Buddhist thinker and leader Daisaku Ikeda, the Center’s programs include public forums and scholarly seminars that are organized collaboratively and offer a range of perspectives on key issues in global ethics.

The Center also publishes books on education and other issues pertaining to the goal of greater human flourishing. The Center’s books have been used in more than 900 college and university courses to date. In 2009, the Center launched its own publishing arm, Dialogue Path Press. Our most recent title is Living As Learning: John Dewey in the 21st Century.

The Center’s signature event is the annual Ikeda Forum for Intercultural Dialogue, now in its eleventh year. 

Not long after the Ikeda Center (originally the Boston Research Center for the 21st Century) was founded, Mr. Ikeda gave the institution the following mottos:

Be the heart of a network of global citizens.
Be a bridge for dialogue between civilizations.
Be a beacon lighting the way to a century of life.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, a video must be worth much more. So rather than take up more space here in Quarterly explaining the Center’s work or republishing the highlights from the site, here is a video that they uploaded last August. It runs 7 minutes and 48 seconds. 

 

 

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