Buddhism and Pragmatism–Part 3

We have set forth basic principles of both Buddhism and Pragmatism in the two previous articles. In the process, we gave some hints of the correlations between the two. In this concluding article we will elaborate on those connections. There is a long history of common conceptual understandings, even before the existence of Pragmatism as a philosophical theory.

Buddhism and Pragmatism–Part 2

“The core of pragmatism was the pragmatist maxim, a rule for clarifying the contents of hypotheses by tracing their ‘practical consequences’. In the work of Peirce and James, the most influential application of the pragmatist maxim was to the concept of truth.”
“[Pragmatism] has significantly influenced non-philosophers—notably in the fields of law, education, politics, sociology, psychology, and literary criticism . . .”

Buddhism and Pragmatism–Part 1

Buddhism is a 2,500 plus year old religion that began in India. Pragmatism is a philosophical system that began in America in the late 19th century. Surprisingly enough, they have some core elements in common. The bottom line, Buddhism is consistent with the traditional aspirations of Americans (and among members of other cultures as well)

Buddhism and Creativity

Renowned musician Herbie Hancock is the 2014 Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University. In that capacity, he delivered six lectures on The Ethics of Jazz. In 2013, he was among those honored at the annual Kennedy Center Honors program. Over his decades-long musical career he has won 14 Grammys, an Academy Award for best soundtrack and received countless other awards or recognitions.